Small Adjustments, Big Results

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As I’ve said in the past, my fitness routine and associated diet over the past year has delivered some mixed results. On the one hand, my body is much stronger than it was a year go. It is also much larger, and not in all the right ways. Now I find myself at a crossroads.

Where did I go wrong?

Wow. It never ceases to amaze me how quickly our bodies can change when we’re not paying attention. I tried on a pair of jeans today that I stopped wearing a year ago because they had started to feel a bit tight.

That’s right, ladies. Even men worry about stuff like that. But probably more, because it means we may have to go…gulp…clothes shopping.

Anyway, I’ve struggled with my weight for nearly my whole life. That doesn’t mean I’ve always been fat, but without exercise and proper nutrition, my body is extremely prone to packing away the fat reserves (must be the Norwegian in me). This is especially true now as I approach my forties.

So what’s the solution? Do I just give up the fight and get ready for winter?

Last week, I pointed out the importance of making small, calculated adjustments to one’s day-to-day routine in order to effect positive changes in body composition and overall wellness. Before I can do that to address my recent weight gain, I need to reflect on a few things.

What do I like and not like about my current health picture?

My lifestyle includes a lot of highly intense, physical activity. I can adjust that a bit, but there is an upper limit to what fitness experts and physicians consider healthy amounts of exercise. So that’s not my problem area. What I’m not happy about, however, is that I’m carrying excess body fat. I’d like to take about 2 inches off my waist measurement.

When did I first take notice of the negative health trend?

About a year ago, I started cycling out clothes that, though they had fit comfortably for years, no longer fit quite right. My mistake was in not being proactive right then and there. Lessons learned…

What changes to my normal routine occurred around that time?

For one, my weightlifting routine changed from a focus on high-intensity, functional lifts that kept me strong and lean to one more centered around mass-building compound movements like dead lifts, squats, bench press, and power cleans that made me stronger and added a bit of bulk. My cardio sessions also dropped significantly around this time.

The added mass obviously changed my calorie requirement a bit and was certainly responsible for some of the 15 lbs I’ve gained in the past year (I’ll probably want to amp up my cardio a little). But it doesn’t explain the excess fat storage. For that, I look to culprit no. 2 — smoking cessation.

I finally kicked the habit after more than 15 years, but like all good things, it came at a price. Somehow, I re-learned to crave certain carb-rich foods. Before I quit smoking cigarettes, I rarely ate heavy carbs at more than one meal a week. Today, carbohydrates are not the exception.

What am I willing to change regarding my current habits?

Thankfully, a carbohydrate habit is MUCH easier to break than a nicotine addiction. I’ve renewed my long-standing pledge to restrict my daily carbohydrate intake. But that doesn’t mean I’m starting some kind of zero carb diet fad — just making some minor adjustments.

Over the past year, I’ve gradually reintroduced certain foods that I long ago eliminated from my diet. To get back to what worked for me before, I need to just nix the junk. I can do that without making drastic changes to my diet.

I eat vegetables (and juice them), eat moderate servings of fresh fruits (and juice them), avoid sugary snacks almost completely, never drink sugary colas, drink a lot of water, choose lean cuts of beef and skinless chicken, and eat fish (though probably not enough of it). None of that needs to change. It’s the extra stuff that just needs to go away. I can do that without feeling like I’m suffering through some major dietary upheaval.

How about you?

Are you dissatisfied with your body composition? Would you like to lose a few inches from your waist? Maybe fat deposits aren’t your concern. Do you want to add some lean mass? What about just getting more fresh fruits and vegetables in your diet. Whatever you want to do, follow the same steps I’ve taken here, and get your routine gradually in tune with your desired end state.

Remember, small, calculated changes are much more lasting than traumatic changes that turn the world as you know it (the one you’ve grown comfortable with) on its head. Food for thought.

Until next time…

Warmest Regards,
~Aj

P.S. Share your thoughts and experiences so others can motivate and be motivated!





Photo courtesy of FreeDigitalPhotos.net

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About Aj

My name is Aj, and I am a fitness and healthy living enthusiast. Please check out my log at www.ajsfocusonfitness.com for more information. View all posts by Aj

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